Rebuilding My Morning Routine

Yesterday, I explained how I use my summer breaks. I mentioned working out first thing in the morning, something I haven’t historically done.

My history with a morning routine goes back to when I worked at Lowe’s between high school and college. I often opened, which meant getting there at 6am. Since I didn’t particularly enjoy being tired all the time, the first step I implemented was a conservative bed time.

When I went to Word of Life, they had required quiet time every morning before class. Because I was a tech guy half the class days, I had to get to class at 7:15, which I then I spent reading until class started.

This carried over to my post Word of Life years, when I started working at Starbucks (as pictured above), and once again had opening shifts (which were 5:30 instead of 6:oo). On days I didn’t work, I began to keep getting up fairly early and went to Starbucks for free coffee. And then I sat and read. And thus a routine was born.

This ritual remained more or less stable for the last 10 years. The whole time I was at Dallas, even when I had 7am Hebrew classes, I was still up earlier, coffee in hand, reading (or studying Hebrew).

If you’ve ever wondered how I read so many books, now you know. I’ve already been reading for an hour before many people hit the snooze button. While this has had its advantages for me, I’ve felt for a long time that I need a more fully developed morning routine.

Back in the spring, I came across an article called 8 Things Every Person Should Do Before 8am. They are:

  1. Get a healthy 7+ hours of sleep
  2. Prayer and meditation
  3. Hard physical activity
  4. Consume 30g of protein
  5. Take a cold shower
  6. Listen to/read uplifting content
  7. Review your life vision
  8. Do at least one thing toward long-term goals

Notice that the very first thing is actually something you do the day before. Over these past 10 years, I’ve somewhat ruthlessly reverse engineered by mornings by guarding my bed time. While I’m a little lax this summer, I tend to go to bed around 10 in order to get up around 5-5:30. This will shift earlier in August to probably going to bed around 9-9:30 in order to be at the gym by 5:15.

That would put me back home around 6:30. By 7:00, I’ll have had the 30g of protein (actually between 45-60g, because I need 235g a day), taken the shower, and started my quiet time. In that way, I’m actually combining the prayer and reading. That leaves the review of the life vision and then doing at least one thing toward long-term goals. Because of my schedule works, on days I don’t teach, I’ll immediately do that thing. Teaching days, I’ll schedule when that thing will happen. For now, that thing is writing 1000 words a day.

I’m doing that because I want to develop as a writer. I also foresee needing to write more frequently for things related to SHIFT. I also would like to one day complete a dissertation, which takes a disciplined approach to writing that I don’t currently have. When you write on a strictly as needed basis, it’s harder to write when you need to. If you write everyday, it becomes easier to at least get the ball rolling on a draft for something.

If I apply the reverse engineering to finishing a Ph.D by the time I’m 40, then I need to develop a disciplined writing habit now. So, doing that everyday is working towards a long-term goal. But, it is also serving several short time goals related to teaching, research and editing, and preparing materials for SHIFT.

I’ve found in the past 10+ years of having a morning routine that if you do something first thing, it usually always gets done. Seems simplistic, but you should start your day with the most important things. If there are habits you want to develop, batch them together in the morning and they will probably stick.

If you’re going to do that, I recommend doing it in phases instead of all at once. So, for instance, when I decided to rebuild my morning habit. I started with the exercise portion. I purchased some workout supplements (this is a referral link, FYI) that included a pre-workout. The dosage includes just under 400mg of caffeine, which is what my Trenta Cold Brew contained.

When I wake up, I wander into the kitchen and mix up the pre-workout, drink it, and then I have 15-30 minutes to get to the gym and get moving. I also can’t bail and go to Starbucks and read instead, because I don’t really want to know what would happen.

In order to re-wire, I started doing this on June 1st. It was a Thursday, but the beginning of summer in my mind (it was my first full day off after teaching responsibilities). I’ve been in the gym lifting for an hour every weekday since then. This past week Thursday, I added cardio to the end of the routine in the form of high intensity interval training (HIIT). When I get home, I take the necessary recovery supplements, eat, and then start working on what needs to get done for the day.

This week, I’m going to start bumping my start time up earlier and re-integrate reading. I’m also re-building my quiet time, something I’ll tell you more about next week.

In the meantime, I’d encourage you to consider a similar morning ritual. When it comes to exercise, it doesn’t need to include the intensity of lifting. There are plenty of excuses to not exercise (at all) and particularly in the morning. But, often it’s because you try to go from nothing to what I’m doing without taking into account your average speed. Which is to say, look at what you’re currently doing, and then increase to the next logical step, not necessarily your final goal. Basically, try starting smaller, like using the 7-minute workout.

If you do, here’s a sample morning routine:

  • Wake-up well rested
  • 7-minute workout
  • Cold shower (closes the pores and ensures you’re wide awake now)
  • Coffee/breakfast
  • Quiet time
  • Review goals and vision
  • Do one thing

Depending on your quiet time length (let’s estimate 20-30 mins to read something and pray), you’re looking at less than an hour of total time before you get to the goal reviewing stage. If you’ve planned accordingly the night before, it is not incredibly hard to get up and get going, especially if you plug your phone in across the room and have to jump up when the alarm goes off.

Author: Nate

I'm an avid reader, musician, and high school Bible teacher living in central Florida. I have many paperback books and our house smells of rich glade air freshners. If you want to know more, then let's connect!

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