Around this time last month, I posted my January Update as part of Tim Challies Reading Challenge. Actually, I’m a little early at this point, but I know going into the weekend what I’ll finish up. Also, I was having trouble getting my thoughts together for a review post. I have a slightly more annotated list this time around. Key word is slightly. I’ve also truncated the checklist to just include books I’ve finished at this point. If you want the whole list, see either my January Update or Challies original post.

Anyway, here’s what I read in February:

  • The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy
    • Like most essay collection on philosophy and pop culture, this was hit or miss (pun intended?)
  • The Scandal of The Evangelical Mind
    • This is a classic book, some of it dated, but most of it still very relevant for diagnosing issues with how (some) evangelicals approach intellectual issues
  • The Pastor: A Memoir
    • I loved this book, and as I said before, am on a Peterson kick at the moment. Highly recommend reading this if you’re involved in ministry.
  • Philosophy in Seven Sentences
    • This was a great overview of important thinkers in philosophy. I’ll say more in my review
  • Five Views on The Church and Politics
    • This book correlates the five views in Niebuhr’s Christ & Culture to approaches to politics. Different views, but not a lot of sparks in the responses.
  • The Birth of The Trinity
    • This book is cost prohibitive for many, but important in terms of explaining the early church’s hermeneutical moves that helped shape our understanding of the doctrine of the Trinity.
  • American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion
    • Very important in light of the upcoming political season. You can be patriotic without being an idolater, but it is apparently really difficult.
  • Politics for Christians
    • This ended up being more philosophical than I expected, and it made be want to read more of Beckwith
  • The Miracles of Jesus
    • I like the charts, but it wasn’t a very engaging read. It is thorough and exhaustive, but also kind of flat.
  • This is Awkward
    • Really enjoyed this one because it made me feel slightly more normal (but not less awkward).
  • Happiness
    • Turns out there isn’t a substantial difference between happiness and joy according to the way the biblical authors used the word. Also hashtag blessed can also be hashtag happy.
  • How to Be an Atheist
    • Excellent dismantling of atheistic approaches to science, reason, and morality, showing their skepticism toward religion needs to be applied more rigorously to their own views
  • Habits of Grace
    • Great introduction to the spiritual disciplines in three fold form (Frame would be proud)
  • Black and White Bible, Black and Blue Wife
    • Horrible marketing with this one. It came unsolicited with a sticker that said “Are evangelical men more likely to abuse their wives?” Not cool Zondervan. However, an important book that was engaging and got me thinking. I’ll post more later.





(image via challies)


When you think of the early church, you may very well picture a dry and dusty time. Or, perhaps it is dry and dusty books about a time that might otherwise be intriguing. Maybe I’m being unfair. But, I don’t know a lot of people who get psyched to study the early church, and if I do, they’re in Ph.D programs somewhere. The average theological reader might not be so stoked.

Hopefully, a new volume by David Wilhite can change that. In The Gospel According to Heretics: Discovering Orthodoxy through Early Christological Conflicts, Wilhite takes readers on the ins and outs of all the major heresies from the early church. The twist is that he offers a fairly sympathetic reading of the heretics themselves. By doing so, Wilhite is not trying to rehabilitate them as theological role models for the 21st century. Rather, he is trying to surface their motivations for making the theological formulations that they did in order that we might understand orthodox Christology better in the process.

Or, as Wilhite says, “In the present book, we would like to hear how orthodoxy was defined by ‘the losers'” (13).

To further clarify the aims, it is important to note that “gospel” in the title is “the intersection of Christology and soteriology” (3) rather than a clear proclamation. Also, because you were somewhat curious, Wilhite says “at the end of the day, I see the heresies as heresies because the teachings are inadequate and unconvincing” (3). So, while he may take the scholarly reassessment of the heretics seriously (rather than strictly sympathetically), he thinks the heretics were ultimately wrong (but not “evil, wicked deviants,” 3).

This becomes important as the book proceeds. As Wilhite notes in the introduction, just because “one of the orthodox made a claim about a certain heretic does not mean we can dismiss said claim and assert the opposite” (4). In other words, while we ultimately disagree with the heretics, we should take the orthodox charges against them with a grain of salt since it was not exactly an age of nuance when it came to denouncing false teaching.

Wilhite wraps up the introduction by opting to not strictly define “orthodoxy” or “heresy.” Instead, he offers some brief characteristics of each and then proceed to show how each heretical teaching came to be considered unorthodox in the chapters that follow. The heretics and teachings he covers are:

  • Marcion: Supersessionism
  • Ebion: Adoptionism
  • Gnostics: Docetism
  • Sabellius: Modalism
  • Arius: Subordinationism
  • Apollinaris: Subhumanism
  • Nestorius: Dyoprosopitism
  • Eutyches: Monophysitism
  • Iconoclasts: Antirepresentationalism
  • Muslims: Reductionism

If you could see things on my end, you’d immediately noticed all the red squiggles. What might jump out more so is the final two items in the list. The first, might not make many Presbyterian’s list of early Christological controversies. The latter wouldn’t make anyone’s list of Christian theological controversies, but Wilhite makes an interesting case for how Muslim Christology developed in context. Given many recent discussions about whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God, this final chapter might be worth the price of the book just on its own.

As far as the earlier chapters, Wilhite does an excellent job of presenting the teaching of each heretic from the point of view of that particular individual (as much as that is possible). He explains his approach earlier in the introduction:

Each chapter begins with a simple summary. This is usually the view expressed about the heretic by the orthodox opponents. Each summary is then supplemented with a closer investigation into the accused heretic and alleged heresy. The heretic in most cases probably did not actually teach the heresy named after him. For example, Nestorius most likely did not teach “Nestorianism.” An alternate name is given, therefore for the actual teaching in order to differentiate what Nestorius himself said (according to our best sources) from the Nestorian heresy (known from the hostile sources) (17-18).

He continues, clarifying his distinction between heretic (and “ism” derived from their name) and heretical teaching:

Again, every case is different: Arius probably taught the heretical doctrine of subordinationism, but even then the term needs to be used instead of “Arianism” because many, if not most, of those deemed “Arians” never read anything by Arius. The heretical doctrine is the main issue, even if it was attached to a certain “arch-heretic” (as the founders of heresy were called), and even if historians doubt the credibility of the accusation against the accused heretic (18).

Having a good general foundation in early Christological conflicts from both my time at Dallas and my reading since, I found Wilhite’s approach intriguing. At times you feel like he’s going to say that someone like Arius really wasn’t wrong. But, he never comes to a conclusion like that, even as he recasts several figures in more sympathetic light. They end up being misunderstood, but never quite orthodox.

This re-reading of the heretics, to me, is a mark of good scholarship on Wilhite’s part. He ultimately doesn’t agree with them, but presents them in the best possible light before pointing the way to orthodoxy. His writing style is also refreshing. He’s done his homework and offers a well researched volume, yet presents his findings in a very conversational and engaging tone. Having never heard of him, or read anything else by him, this was a good introduction to his scholarship.

On the whole, I’d highly recommend this book. For a church history type class, it would make a good textbook because of the design layout (sidebars and whatnot). It is probably a mid-level introduction for someone to get into the early Christological conflicts. That is to say, if you’ve never heard of the many or all of the “isms” listed above, this might not be the best place to start (try Holcomb’s Know the Heretics instead). If however, like me, you’ve interacted a bit with the early church conflicts that led to many of the church councils. This is a very intriguing read. It is also worthy grabbing for the final chapter on Muslim Christological developments as well. It follows the same trajectory as the other heretics, which as you can imagine, would make for interesting reading.

David E. Wilhite, The Gospel According to Heretics: Discovering Orthodoxy through Early Christological Conflicts. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, October, 2015. 304 pp. Paperback, $22.99.

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Thanks to Baker Academic for the review copy!


If one were to put together a list of influential theologians in the history of the church, Augustine would certainly be near the top. In terms of sheer literary output, not to mention kick-starting a genre (autobiography), Augustine towers over other theologians. Yet, he was primarily a pastor (bishop) for his day job. As such, he had much to say when it came to living the Christian life. Thanks to Crossway’s Theologians on The Christian Life series, you can read many of those insights in one place.

When compared to the other authors in the series, Augustine may seem out of place. The book itself is a bit out of place in terms of style. Gerald Bray chose to divide up the nearly 200 pages into only 5 chapters. Those five chapters give readers a window into Augustine’s life and background, his Christian faith, his influence as a teacher, his role as a pastor, and his impact on today. These chapters are bookended by a rundown on the Latin titles of Augustine’s works (and their English translations) and suggestions for further reading.

So far, you could have gathered much of this yourself by an attentive reading of the table of contents (which is the first step of good book reviewing mind you). You may still be wondering why Augustine made the list for this particular series. He is the oldest author by far, and the only pre-Reformation selection. Toward the end of Bray’s book I think he gives a good reason:

Augustine had the good fortune, if we can call it that, to have lived in the last generation of antiquity. After his death, it was still possible for some people in the Latin West to get a good classical education, as the careers of Boethius, Cassiodorus, and Gregory the Great remind us, but the were exceptions. The old Roman world no longer has urban centers where a large educated public eagerly debated philosophy and theology. Classical allusions fell on increasingly deaf ears as fewer and fewer people were brought up on the literary treasures of pre-Christian times. For many, Augustine – and especially The City of God – became the lens through which they read about what had gone before. He was the source, the encyclopedia of knowledge, through which the whole of antiquity, pagan and Christian, was distilled (192).

In the opening chapter, after his biographical sketch of Augustine, and before his short description of basic beliefs, Bray breaks down all the categories of writing Augustine left us:

  • Autobiographical
  • Philosophical
  • Exegetical
  • Doctrinal
  • Apologetical
  • Pastoral and Monastic
  • Polemical
  • Letters and Sermons

As he notes, “No ancient Christian writer has left us a larger corpus of writings than Augustine” (29). He left over 100 books, 307 known letters, and 583 sermons. If you math, you could figure out that Augustine averaged 3 books a year during his writing career.

With all this in mind, Augustine becomes the obvious candidate for inclusion in this series. He “was the greatest of the Latin (Western) church fathers” (191) and is the window in what came before him for much of the Western world. As far as influential Christian writers of his stature, perhaps Aquinas deserves inclusion in a series like this, but I can’t see him making the cut for various reasons.

Turning back to the book itself, the second chapter begins the exposition proper when it comes to Augustine’s understanding of the Christian life. Here, Bray guides readers through Augustine’s conversion, devotional life, family life and personal values, his choice of lifestyle (celibate), and his general life of faith. In chapter 3, the focus shifts to Augustine as a teacher of the Bible, as well as philosophy (briefly in regards to things and signs) and theology. Chapter 4 turns to his pastoral work, particularly the trials of parish life and his preaching.

In the final chapter, Bray kind of summarizes all that came before, but in the context of how it relates to our world today. He notes two emphases of Augustine’s that are relevant, especially in our modern world:

  • His emphasis on the relationship of the individual to God (198)
  • His adherence to the church (200)

We can tend to opt for one of the other, yet Augustine held both strongly. In addition Bray notes several teaching emphases that continue to have impact:

  • The human race is united in sin and rebellion against God and cannot save itself (201)
  • The Word of God is to be found in the Bible and nowhere else (203)
  • God is a Trinity of love (206)
  • God created the world for a purpose (208)
  • The Christian’s life is a journey that we walk by faith (210)
  • The Christian mission is important wherever it is exercised (212)

Taking all of these together provides a good snapshot of Augustine’s teaching as it related to the Christian life. I would say after reading this that there is much for modern evangelicals to learn from Augustine, even if we might disagree with some of his theological leanings. But, that’s probably true of pretty much every author featured in this series. Bray does an excellent job of presenting Augustine sympathetically, but without overshadowing that Augustine comes from a very different time and place and saw the world much differently than we do.

As a minor criticism, I would have liked to have the chapters laid out in a more digestible form. The chapters are long compared to other volumes in this series and the headings are not numerous. I found that it was hard to read in spurts. Bray can obviously divide up the material however he likes, and I do like his conceptual layout. Perhaps if I had not read nearly all the other volumes already, I wouldn’t have had a chapter length expectation in play. As I’ll say though for pretty much all the volumes in this series, it is one you should take, read, and hopefully grow in your walk with Christ as a result.

Gerald Bray, Augustine on The Christian Life: Transformed by The Power of God. Wheaton: Crossway, October, 2015. 232 pp. Paperback, $18.99.

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Everyone who reads a good bit has favorite authors. When another author uses many of your favorite authors in writing their book, it usually catches your attention. That was my experience in reading through Daniel Strange’s Their Rock Is Not Like Our Rock: A Theology of Religions. I made most of my way through it back in the fall while I was teaching a section on world religions in my senior Bible class (senior as in 12th graders). I was delighted to see numerous uses of Reformed authors like Van Til, Frame, and Bavinck (although often a different Bavinck than Herman). Even Greg Bahnsen makes several appearances (although mostly because of his book on Van Til). What this means is that Strange is writing a theology of world religions that is relying heavily on insights from presuppositional apologetics, and for that we should be glad.

After an autobiographical prologue that helps set the context for Strange’s study, his opening chapter lays out the task of explaining the religious Other from a Christian worldview. Here he gives the theology of religions that he will defend:

From the presupposition of an epistemologically authoritative biblical revelation, non-Christian religions are sovereignly directed, variegated and dynamic, collective human idolatrous responses to divine revelation behind which stand deceiving demonic forces. Being antithetically against yet parasitically dependent upon the truth of the Christian worldview, non-Christian religions are ‘subversively fulfilled’ in the gospel of Jesus Christ (42).

This dense statement gives the rough outline of the book that follows. Chapter 2 lays out the case for man as homo adorans. Moving from the foundation of the creature Creator distinction in Genesis, Strange works out a theology of man inherently religious. This then leads to a chapter on how people respond to the “remnantal” revelation available because of God’s common grace. The following chapter picks up the story of Babel and shows its importance for religious diversity. From here, Strange offers a theology of religions from the rest of the Old Testament in chapter 5 and then does the same for the New in chapter 6. The next chapter details Strange’s understanding of “subversive fulfillment” in order to then lay out some missiological implications in the following chapter. The final chapter offers pastoral perspective and insight in light of the preceding study.

This book is a significant contribution to understanding and explaining world religions from a Reformed perspective. It is a resource I will return to and utilize in my own study. I found some of the material too academic for high school introductions, but I used some of the main ideas (everyone knows there is a God and everyone worships). If I had more time to ruminate, I would have liked to trace out how Buddhism and Hinduism are subversively fulfilled by the gospel. Strange applies his insight to Islam and that makes this book all the more valuable in the current cultural situation.

A downside I found is that the book is perhaps longer than it needed to be. Part of this is the thoroughness of Strange’s argument (which I suppose is not a bad thing). The other part is excessive and lengthy block quotes. The tend to clutter the text and make it harder to follow the argument. In many cases it was easier to visually skip over the block quote and read Strange’s concluding summary sentence that lead into the next paragraph. This is mainly a stylistic consideration though, and shouldn’t detract from the overall value of the resource. An upside would be that Strange provides many extended excerpts from his primary sources. A downside is that his thoughts can get lost in the shuffle at times.

In the end, I would highly recommend this book if you are interested in apologetics in general and world religions in particular. I had thought this before reading, but now I have a good argument that the resources from Reformed writers like Van Til, Frame, and Bavinck (Herman and J. H.) provide the best explanation for world religions. If you can get through the block quotes, this is a resource you’ll want to spend some time working through.

Daniel Strange, Their Rock Is Not Like Our Rock: A Theology of Religions. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, February, 2015. 384 pp. Paperback, $24.99.

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New Books of Note

February 10, 2016 — Leave a comment


There are a handful of books that every seminary student should have on writing. Michael Kibbe’s From Topic to Thesis is one of them. Thanks to IVP Academic, I was able to get a copy and read it rather quickly. While short, small, and new, it provides a concise and step by step overview from moving from an idea to a finished paper. Or as the title suggests, from a topic (like one assigned in a seminary class) to a thesis (what you’ll actually argue in your paper). The introduction is the longest chapter in the book and orients readers to how theological research is like as well as unlike other types of research. In addition, readers are introduced to the distinction between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources. Each of the following chapters explain one step in the method of research:

  • Finding direction
  • Gathering sources
  • Understanding issues
  • Entering discussion
  • Establishing a position

Along the way, the author gives real life examples using a biblical studies paper as well as a theological studies one. The last third of the book is appendices covering topics like what to never do in a research paper, research and writing tools, scholarly resources, how to navigate ATLA, how to use Zotero, and a suggested timeline for your research.

I found the book to be very helpful for my own rusty thinking on paper writing. I tend to have difficulty moving from topic to thesis so this book was exactly what I needed to prod me along and I think I’ll plan to utilize it for an upcoming paper proposal. As I do, I fill you more in on the guidance the book offers.


As a follow up to his Dude’s Guide to Manhood, Darrin Patrick teamed up with his wife Amie to write The Dude’s Guide to Marriage. Thanks to Thomas Nelson I was able to get a copy and see what I thought. In some ways, much of the advice here should be basic common sense. However, as someone who went through pre-marital counseling and still ended up clueless about certain things, I’d say common sense isn’t initially all that common. If you look at the chapter titles, you’ll notice there is nothing that revolutionary:

  • Listen
  • Talk
  • Fight
  • Grow
  • Provide
  • Rest
  • Serve
  • Submit
  • Pursue
  • Worship

Well, maybe the submit part (and maybe the fight part). On the whole though, I think most dude’s would at least tacitly understand they should listen, talk, fight (argue), grow, provide, rest, etc. There is a gap though between knowing what you should hypothetically do and knowing how to actually do it well. That is where this book can be a valuable resource. In a way it is basic. But, dudes tend to need basic (even if they won’t admit it). I found the value not so much in the exposition but in the discussion questions provided at the end for talking with your wife. This isn’t to say that the Patricks honesty and vulnerability in letting us in our their marriage isn’t helpful. It’s more to note that if I only read their exposition, it might help my own self-understanding, but I need to take the topics and discussion questions to talk things through with my wife. My biggest problem, and probably most guys problem is to read something like this and just assume I’m nailing all of it and then move on. I have to take the extra step of actually seeing what my wife thinks and the Patricks have a provide a good discussion starter for doing just that.


A couple of summers ago I enjoyed reading Zack Eswine’s Sensing Jesus: Life and Ministry as a Human Being. This was both because of content and style. In terms of the former, it is a very reassuring and realistic encouragement to those of us in ministry that we don’t have to be perfect. This focus pairs well with Eswine’s meditative and reflective writing style. Having also benefited from his preaching book, I thought I’d use Crossway’s Beyond the Page program to read The Imperfect Pastor.

Upon getting it though, I was a bit disappointed. Maybe not as much as Mike Leake, but close (read his review of Sensing Jesus). As Eswine explains in the introduction:

The book you hold in your hands is, in some measure, an updated— and shortened— rewrite of my earlier work Sensing Jesus. I hesitated when I was invited to rewrite the earlier volume. Like any writer, I contemplated the loss of prized sentences, and I flinched. But now I give thanks for the opportunity and the effort. This new work, The Imperfect Pastor, is half the size of Sensing Jesus; nevertheless, one-third of the content is brand-new. Sensing Jesus will find its place in used bookstores and academic libraries, while The Imperfect Pastor will stand on its own with distinct language, size, content, and purpose. I hope that in its pages you will find the grace of Jesus for your life and ministry. (Kindle Loc., 117-122)

In other words, if you’ve read Sensing Jesus, there’s nothing particularly new here. And the downside is that you can’t tell that until you read the introduction since there’s nothing about the book or endorsements on say Amazon that suggest this is an updated, shortened rewrite of an earlier book. On the plus side, Sensing Jesus is out of print and not readily available. So while it is a great book and probably one every pastor should read, they can now read this instead. And to be honest, that might be for the better. One of the downsides of Sensing Jesus is that the chapters seemed much too long for the content being discussed. Now, that’s not really a problem. This is a leaner, meaner version of the book and will probably end up more widely read than its predecessor. So, on the one hand, it’s unfortunate it wasn’t more obvious this is a re-write. On the other, it is a needed re-write and this is probably a better go-to recommendation than Eswine’s previous work.


Lastly, Zondervan sent me an advanced reading copy of Todd Wilson’s More: Find Your Personal Calling and Live Life to The Fullest Measure. Generally speaking, I hate advanced reading copies because they are step below eBooks in that they are not actual flesh and blood books and also are a slight step beyond a rough draft of the final book. Perhaps it is for the best since I mistakenly thought this was a book on life calling by Todd Wilson, as in the the co-author of The Pastor Theologian and solo author of Real Christian: Bearing the Marks of Authentic Faith. It is however, a book by an entirely different Todd Wilson, one who is the founder of Exponential.

The book looks promising. The first part explains what a calling is and the second part helps you find yours. Giving it the brief flip through that an ARC deserves, I’d say it would be a helpful book to work through if you’re feeling stuck where you’re at in life. Or, if you’re a college student and not sure what to do after graduation. Or, if you’ve graduated but are not enjoying your current or previous jobs (and aren’t sure about the future either). For any of these reasons, you might still need clarification on what your calling in life is. Wilson appears to help readers ground their personal life calling in the larger story of what God is doing in the world and then discover what they should be doing regardless of their ultimate role (i.e. be a disciple and make disciples). I might give this to a friend who is asking these questions and get back to you and what they think. The book itself comes out in April, so keep an eye out for it if anything I’ve said piqued your interest.


Usually, I am very high on any volume in the New Studies in Biblical Theology series. You can probably tell already that I might feel differently about Richard Lints’ Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion (NSBT). Given that my interest in this subject reaches back to mid-seminary and my discovery of G. K. Beale, I had high hopes for this volume. For whatever reason, I found it less engaging to read than I expected and almost immediately forgettable.

Perhaps that is too strong. Let’s start again.

Richard Lints latest addition to the New Studies in Biblical Theology series, Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion traces out our understanding of Genesis 1:26-27 for a biblical theology of the image of God. The inversion of this image leads to idolatry, conceptually speaking. The opening chapter provides a conceptual and somewhat sociological orientation to the subject. In chapter 2, Lints turns to the foundation of our creation in God’s image in Genesis 1:26-27. This additionally opens up discussion about the nature of human identity and human nature itself. In chapter 3, Lints makes note of the liturgical nature of creation and explains briefly the cosmic temple idea. This leads to a deepening of this motif in chapter 4 where Lints discusses how man was intended to image the Creator King in his cosmic temple.

Chapter 5 presents a turning point for here Lints notes the post fall origins of idolatry. Special attention is paid to the golden calf incident, as well as the prophetic foundation laid in Deuteronomy for invectives against idolatrous practices. In chapter 6, Lints moves to the New Testament, specifically Romans 1, 1 Corinthian 10, Acts 7 and 17, and Colossians 1. From here, chapter 7 turns an interesting analysis of the masters of suspicion (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche) and their “religious” critique of religion (Feuerbach makes an appearance as well). Here the focus is on idolatry as the key issue driving some of the critics of religion. That is to say, not necessarily their idolatry, but their recognition of idolatries that have found a home in religious practices. There is a sense in which their criticisms are valid, but their target is not Christianity in its truest, intended form. The final chapter brings the insights into the present cultural situation and draws some interesting applications.

On the whole, there is much of interest in Lints’ work. Perhaps the best criticism is that it doesn’t seem quite at home in this series. Given the nature of the series, one would expect more extended exegetical analysis than is offered. It is however still offering a biblical theology of the image of God and its inversion by tracing the story from Genesis 1 into the New Testament and noting the developments along the way. On the other hand, this volume is bit more philosophical (not a bad thing) than others and perhaps reflects that it is written by a theologian with philosophical and anthropological interests rather than lexical or exegetical ones (though obviously these are not mutually exclusive interests).

Depending on what you think a book in this series should do, you might find this a welcome change of pace, or a frustrating read. It didn’t stick that well with me as I read it, and that may be more due to how I was reading it than a defect in the volume itself. As I went back through to prepare this review, I found myself wanting to go back and give it a closer read for whatever that is worth. Will I actually do that? Probably not until I need to for some research project, but that tempers my opening comments a bit. If nothing else, this book clocks in under 200 pages and if you are at all interested in understanding the image of God in theological and philosophical context, you’ll probably want to at least check this out.

Richard Lints, Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion (NSBT)Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, August 2015. 192  pp. Paperback, $22.00.

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I’ve found that when it comes to blogging, I tend to go back and forth between being over-disciplined (to the neglect of perhaps more important tasks), to being so occasional that I easily outpace my review requests. This past blogging season has been the latter. While it has been good to take a slight break, I’d like to be a little more disciplined, for a couple of reasons at least. First, I need to write more frequently. This helps me fulfill reviews, but it also helps me think more clearly. Second, I’d like to be more organized in general, and this is a particular way to pursue that. Reading is easier than writing and too often I take the path of least resistant with my discretionary time.

With that in mind, I’m going to start forecasting reviews that I have coming up during the month and try to pair them together in groups of 2-3 each week. The groups will be thematic, or at least related to each other in some way. For this month, here’s what I’ve got:


This week I’ll have a New Books of Note post featuring some shorter, lighter books (From Topic to Thesis, The Dude’s Guide to Marriage, The Imperfect Pastor, More). The main reviews though will be Richard Lints volume in New Studies in Biblical Theology, Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion and Daniel Strange’s Their Rock is Not Like Our Rock: A Theology of Religions. Both of these titles focus heavily on the early chapters of Genesis as well as the concept of idolatry. Lints’ book is more about how idolatry in general forms, while Strange’s book is more about the nature of world religions from a Reformed theological perspective.

Early Church

Next week, I want to turn attention to the early church. As promised, I’ll have a review of Augustine on The Christian Life to start the Theologians on The Christian Life series. In addition, I’ll have some thoughts on David Wilhite’s The Gospel According to Heretics: Discovering Orthodoxy through Early Christological Conflicts. In the case of these two, there isn’t much conceptual overlap, but they do deal with the same period of church history.


In the final week of February, I’ll finish with three books on the Trinity (obviously). First, I’ll talk about Wesley Hill’s Paul and The Trinity, the first book I finished this year. Next, assuming I stay on track with reading, I’ll post on The Birth of The Trinity: Jesus, God, and Spirit in New Testament and Early Christian Interpretations of the Old Testament. Based on my thematic ordering, this could have been placed in the previous week, but then I’d only have two Trinity books and that just won’t do! I suppose if I had made more headway in The Oxford Handbook of The Trinity, I could post on it here, and have three reviews in back to back weeks. That’s kind of aggressive though. Instead, I’ll wrap up here with Roderick Durst’s Reordering the Trinity: Six Movements of God in The New Testament.

That gives you an idea what I have planned. Often, I will try to introduce new blog features only to abandon them shortly after. This may very well be another one of those failed experiments. Hopefully not!


A couple of weeks back I posted about Tim Challies Reading Challenge. I noticed last week that he posted a January update and I thought I’d do the same. I’ll be a little less annotated in listing the books I finished since several of them I need to post full reviews of. I am self consciously following Challies’ format and used his overall checklist as well (see below). Also, for much the same reasons he listed, I decided to not try to stick with the stages of the plan but read widely and checked books off from the whole list as completed.

Here’s what I read in January:

As you can see, I was mainly working through books for review still. I’m also on pace to hit around 132 books give or take. However, I have moved toward diversifying my reading somewhat, especially in the direction of spiritual theology (more on that soon).

Here’s the whole list, in case you’re curious:



  • ☐ A book written by a Puritan
  • ☐ A book recommended by a family member
  • ☐ A book by or about a missionary
  • ☐ A novel that won the Pulitzer Prize
  • ☒ A book written by an Anglican (Paul and The Trinity)
  • ☐ A book with at least 400 pages
  • ☐ A book by C.S. Lewis or J.R.R. Tolkien
  • ☐ A book that has a fruit of the Spirit in the title
  • ☐ A book with a great cover
  • ☐ A book on the current New York Times list of bestsellers
  • ☐ A book about church history
  • ☐ A graphic novel
  • ☐ A book of poetry


  • ☐ A book from a theological viewpoint you disagree with
  • ☐ A book written by an author with initials in their name
  • ☐ A book that won a ECPA Christian Book Award
  • ☐ A book about worldview
  • ☐ A play by William Shakespeare
  • ☐ A humorous book
  • ☐ A book based on a true story
  • ☐ A book written by Jane Austen
  • ☐ A book by or about Martin Luther
  • ☐ A book with 100 pages or less
  • ☐ A book with a one-word title
  • ☐ A book about money or finance
  • ☐ A novel set in a country that is not your own
  • ☐ A book about music
  • ☐ A memoir
  • ☐ A book about joy or happiness
  • ☐ A book by a female author
  • ☒ A book whose title comes from a Bible verse (Eat This Book)
  • ☐ A book you have started but never finished
  • ☐ A self-improvement book
  • ☐ A book by David McCullough
  • ☐ A book you own but have never read
  • ☐ A book about abortion
  • ☐ A book targeted at the other gender
  • ☐ A book by a speaker at a conference you have attended
  • ☐ A book written by someone of a different ethnicity than you


  • ☐ A book published by The Banner of Truth
  • ☐ A book about the Reformation
  • ☐ A book written by a first-time author
  • ☐ A biography of a world leader
  • ☐ A book used as a seminary textbook
  • ☐ A book about food
  • ☐ A book about productivity
  • ☐ A book about or relationships or friendship
  • ☐ A book about parenting
  • ☐ A book about philosophy
  • ☐ A book about art
  • ☐ A book with magic
  • ☐ A book about prayer
  • ☒ A book about marriage (The Dude’s Guide to Marriage)
  • ☐ A book about a hobby
  • ☐ A book of comics
  • ☐ A book about the Second World War
  • ☐ A book about sports
  • ☐ A book by or about a pastor’s wife
  • ☐ A book about suffering
  • ☐ A book by your favorite author
  • ☐ A book you have read before
  • ☐ A book about homosexuality
  • ☐ A Christian novel
  • ☐ A book about psychology
  • ☐ A book about the natural world
  • ☐ A book by or about Charles Dickens
  • ☐ A novel longer than 400 pages
  • ☐ A historical book
  • ☐ A book about the Bible
  • ☐ A book about a country or city
  • ☐ A book about astronomy
  • ☐ A book with an ugly cover
  • ☐ A book by or about a martyr
  • ☐ A book by a woman conference speaker
  • ☒ A book by or about the church fathers (Augustine on The Christian Life)
  • ☐ A book about language
  • ☐ A book by or about a Russian
  • ☐ A book about leadership
  • ☐ A book about public speaking
  • ☐ A book by Francis Schaeffer
  • ☐ A book by a Presbyterian
  • ☐ A book about science
  • ☐ A book about revival
  • ☐ A book about writing
  • ☐ A book about evangelism
  • ☐ A book about ancient history
  • ☒ A book about preaching (Preaching the Whole Counsel of God)
  • ☐ A book about the church
  • ☐ A book about adoption
  • ☐ A photo essay book
  • ☐ A book written in the twentieth century

(image via challies)


On Monday, I mentioned a new review series I planned to start. While this book is not part of that series, it covers a very similar terrain. Edited by Kent Eilers and Kyle Strobel, Sanctified By Grace: A Theology of The Christian Life is a collection of essays articulating the Christian life “in dogmatic key” (3). If we play with the musical metaphor, the idea is that one could compose the melody of the Christian life in a variety of key signatures, but this work does so using the resources of Christian dogmatics. I’m sitting here trying  to think of what other “keys” one might use, but am drawing a blank. I think we need to tweak the metaphor a bit so that it works better.

“Modes” is a better option, but transposition doesn’t work as well. A song in C major won’t sound drastically different if played in D major (unless you have perfect pitch). A song in C Ionian (major) will sound much different than a song in C Dorian, but that is a modality shift rather than a key signature change. Technically, it appears as a key signature change on the score, but the tonal center that emerges in the song would lead you to figure out the mode employed. The difference between C Ionian and C Dorian is not the tonal center, but the steps between the degrees of the scale used.

If we take the idea of tonal center and connect that with the Christian life, we would say the tonal center is “communion with the triune God through union with Christ in the Spirit” (3). Building out from the tonal center and utilizing all the richness of the tones in the key signature is what the authors seem to envision doing. In that sense, the better description is an account of the Christian life that explores the full scale of notes and harmonic richness from Christian dogmatics. Different doctrinal connection points represent different tones within a scale. Many accounts of the Christian life stick close to a single tonal center, perhaps only deviating to the octave or interval of a 5th above, giving minimal melodic or harmonic variation. Here, the full range of tones and harmonies are brought into play, weaving together a more interesting melodic result.

With that metaphor in mind, here’s how the authors describe (not metaphorically) what their aim is:

While the primary reference of “the Christian life” is the lived experience of Christian identity, as a doctrinal locus it stands dogmatically related to other areas of Christian witness such as the doctrines of the Trinity, creation and providence, Christ, the church and the final consummation (to name a few). Being so related, the doctrine of the Christian life is informed and illumined by a whole series of theological claims about God, such as his relation to created reality, his reconciling works and the human activities which arise from them. In turn, those other doctrines are likewise informed and illumined through the doctrine of the Christian life. Our approach thus articulates a theology of the Christian life in terms of the whole of the Christian confession rather than just one dimension (3).

Ultimately, they suggest that this volume provides “a theology of the Christian life oriented around the triune God of grace” (6). This is seen in the outline which breaks out into four parts. The first, “The Gracious One” has essays on the triune God (Fred Sanders), the electing God (Suzanne McDonald), the creating and providential God (Katherine Sonderegger), the saving God (Ian McFarland), and the perfecting God (Christopher R. J. Holmes). Part Two, “The Graces of The Christian Life,” covers reconciliation and justification (John Burgess), redemption (Christiaan Mostert), and mortification and vivification (John Webster). Part Three, “The Means of Grace” provides a pair of essays on Scripture (Donald Wood) and church and sacraments (Tom Greggs). The final part, “The Practices of Grace” focuses on discipleship (Philip Ziegler), prayer (Ashley Cocksworth), theology (Ellen T. Charry), preaching (William Willimon), and forgiveness (D. Stephen Long).

While in some sense that gives you an idea of what the topics and writers include, in another sense, it doesn’t quite give you a feel for the book. To help with that, I entered into a technical discussion about music theory just a few paragraphs ago. If you already understand music theory fairly well, you could probably connect the dots. If not, it might have been harder to follow what I was explaining. In a similar way, the more familiar you are with Barth and other major figures of 20th century theology, the more comfortable you’ll be with the dogmatic expositions in this more or less academic theological work. If you have a finger on the pulse of recent theological movements, you’ll follow the discussions fairly well.

I had originally gotten this work for myself out of interest, and abandoned reading halfway through. I was later contacted to participate in a blog tour, and so I resumed and finished the remaining essays. I’m glad I pushed through to get to the ones by Webster and Willimon which I found particularly insightful. Closely behind were the ones on theology and prayer. While the essay on discipleship provides an interesting theological meditation on the topic, it is not particularly helpful if you’re interested in how to actual disciple someone. Granted, that’s not the focus of the essay (or the work as a whole), but it is perhaps a bit ironic.

This further illustrates the kind of book under consideration. This is not a book of practical theology, at least in the typical evangelical sense. It is a book of academic and dogmatic theological reflection on topics connected to the Christian life. The price probably prohibits it from consideration by the average reader and the content makes it something I couldn’t recommend to anyone in my church (which tells you both about my church and the book). However, it could be of particular use in a classroom setting, but most likely only for upper-level undergrad or introductory level seminary courses. With the opportunity to discuss further in that setting, this book could be more useful, but only if the class itself has the facility in modern theology that enables a clearer reading.

That being said, I do like what Eilers and Strobel were aiming at in their goals for the book. I don’t think that all of the essays necessarily hit the mark (although Sanders sure did). I would be particularly interested in a more user friendly version of a book like for people like me involved in the discipleship and equipping of a local body of believers. I’m not entirely sure what that would look like and don’t particularly fault Eilers and Strobel for not producing that volume. This book sets the tone at least for books like that could follow (and I mean that in the sense of the musical metaphor from above) and I will look forward to that eventual composition.

Kent Eilers & Kyle Strobel, eds., Sanctified By Grace: A Theology of The Christian LifeNew York: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, August 2014. 288 pp. Paperback, $39.99.

See other posts in the blog tour

Visit the publisher’s page


Thanks to the generosity of Crossway, I will be posting reviews of the Theologians on The Christian Life series over the next several months. I have one more to finish reading, but since I just recently finished Augustine on The Christian Life, I’m ready to get started.

Recently, I’ve wanted to refocus my attention on the basic of living the Christian life. Some of that is because of teaching commitments (at school and soon at church). Some of that is because of just feeling rusty myself in terms of basic spiritual disciplines. Another part of it is my fairly longstanding interest in the relationship of good works to the life of faith in Christ. When you add all these together, it should make for a good spring series.

I thought it might be interesting to do the series chronologically by theologian rather than book release date. This particularly series unfortunately only has Augustine before the Reformation, but given some of Bray’s comments, it is probably a justified choice (more on that in the actual review). There are more 20th century theologians than I think any other single century. Also, were it not for Wesley, it would be a fairly monochrome sample of Reformed authors (the Germans being mild outliers).

Regardless, in this stack you have some of the most influential Christian theologians and their thoughts on the Christian life. I thought it might be interesting to move through them in a way that gives a brief overview of each book, notes which ones are stronger contributions than others, and over time, note what themes are held in common by each of these writers. With only one title left to read (Bonhoeffer), I have a pretty good idea what these themes might look like, but it will be clearly as I actually start writing the reviews. By next week, I’ll hopefully have Augustine ready to go and then we’ll see how it goes from there!