On The Blog in March

March 2, 2016 — Leave a comment

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Hard to believe it’s been a month since the last On the Blog post. That’s because it has only been a little over 3 weeks thanks to a short month and a late post. Looking ahead to the rest of the month, I’ve got plenty more reviews to post. So much so that I decided to follow the format of this past Monday’s post 3 Books on The Trinity.

Often I’ll find after I’ve read or browsed a book for review I don’t want to do a full critical review. In the past, these titles usually end up in a New Books of Note post. However, I’ve decided these sorts of posts will be reserved for digital copies, or books that really just didn’t grab me. My general policy is to mention in 200-300 words any book that I request and receive. I’ve found though that there’s a type of book that I’d like to say more about, but not necessarily to the level of 1000-1200 words. Instead, I’ve like to post about these books in tandem with other similar books. This places them in conversation with other recently published works and I think adds value to the shorter review.

With that in mind, here’s the topics coming up this month:

  • Politics
  • Modern Theology
  • Jesus
  • Philosophy

Looking at the books pictured, I think you can figure out which three go in which week. There are a few outliers though. One is Sammy Rhodes book This is Awkward. I might give it a stand alone review, or write something about it elsewhere. Another, not pictured, is Ruth Tucker’s Black and White Bible, Black and Blue Wife, which might get its own review post. Also not pictured (because it was digital) is David Mathis’ Habits of Grace, which might end up getting its own post as well.

I was going to do a Reformation themed week later in the month, but decided against it. Instead, I’m going to pick up and continue the Theologians on The Christian Life series later this month and try to do one a week for the rest of the spring.

There are some series I’d like to pick up and continue. This includes the What Are/Is ______________? Some Recommend Reading. I really need to do a post on Biblical Theology and Systematic Theology. This month might be the month.

I also don’t want to fully abandon writing about book reviews or seminary study. My next two seminary posts will be Where Should I Go? and What Should I Learn? My next post for the book reviewing is probably going to be about reading and marking books.

All of this is to say that I’m trying to implement a principle from my devotional life into blogging. I’ve been teaching a spiritual disciplines class at church and we talked through this briefly this past Sunday. Basically, the idea is that you should have something fixed and something fluid (HT: David Mathis’ quote of William Law for this idea). With my devotions, I have a fixed reading plan (two actually) but I have flexibility to study more any given day. I’m working to implement that into my prayer life as well.

When it comes to blogging, I’ve tended to be one or the other. Over the spring and into the summer, I’m working toward having a fixed posting schedule at the beginning of the month, but being flexible about changing it up or adding to it as things come to mind. Or, as life provides opportunities to get out of the office and do stuff. I tend to make decisions based on what I’d regret not doing later and so that leads to things like driving to Tampa to hang out with your best friends for 24 hours before they move back to Tennessee instead of writing three separate blog posts on books related to the Trinity. Nothing wrong with either course of action, but I’d rather look back and say I took the trip and squeezed the writing down than vice versa. In the end, I think I accomplished both goals, so hopefully I can continue that trend into the coming months!

Nate

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I'm an avid reader, musician, and high school Bible teacher living in central Florida. I have many paperback books and our house smells of rich glade air freshners. If you want to know more, then let's connect!

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