NIV Faithlife Study Bible: Intriguing Insights to Inform Your Faith

April 11, 2017 — Leave a comment

If you’re keeping score at home, I’ve now posted on 3 consecutive NIV Study Bibles from Zondervan. First, it was the new NIV Zondervan Study Bible. Then it was the Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible. Now, it’s the Faithlife Study Bible.

If you’re not familiar (and even if you are), Faithlife is the parent company of Logos Bible Software. As such, this is a resource that has been available on Logos for a while, but not in print. Actually, the idea goes back to 2011. Since then, the notes have been edited and expanded by a team of collaborators, so much so that there are not authors listed for the notes like most study Bibles. There are major articles by specific authors, but the notes are truly a team effort more so than other study Bibles.

In addition, there is a strong visual element to this study Bible. Not that other study Bibles don’t have graphics and/or illustrations. But, it seems to be more of a focus here. You can get a feel for that by browsing the sample that is offered here (also see the infographics offered here).

As you browse that sample, you’ll notice on pages 34-35 that there is an article on How to Study The Bible. While it might seem germane to point out, the purpose of a study Bible is to help people study the Bible. The problem that is often encountered is that people don’t just naturally know how to study the Bible (probably because we don’t always teach how people to study books well in general). While the Faithlife Study Bible provides answers to questions readers will have, it also hopes to help shape readers into study-ers, as they learn how to take their study into their own hands.

From what I’ve gathered, it seems like the Faithlife Study Bible fits somewhere between the aformentioned ones. It retains a good bit of cultural background info (maybe more so than a typical study Bible), but that’s not the main focus. On the other hand, it aims to provide good introductory articles, as well as a side articles on topics important to theology, biblical studies, and even discipleship. It manages to do so with being too bulky, or overwhelming the reader with information. In short, it might be one of the best introductory study Bibles you could give to someone. While I think I’ll always be partial to the ESV Study Bible, I’m going to be checking this one out a little more thoroughly in the coming weeks and months to see if my initial impressions prove true, and if it just might sway me to change by loyalty.

In the meantime, check it out for yourself, and enjoy the video below with Q&A on the book with Michael Bird!

Nate

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I'm an avid reader, musician, and high school Bible teacher living in central Florida. I have many paperback books and our house smells of rich glade air freshners. If you want to know more, then let's connect!

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