Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion (NSBT)

February 9, 2016 — Leave a comment

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Usually, I am very high on any volume in the New Studies in Biblical Theology series. You can probably tell already that I might feel differently about Richard Lints’ Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion (NSBT). Given that my interest in this subject reaches back to mid-seminary and my discovery of G. K. Beale, I had high hopes for this volume. For whatever reason, I found it less engaging to read than I expected and almost immediately forgettable.

Perhaps that is too strong. Let’s start again.

Richard Lints latest addition to the New Studies in Biblical Theology series, Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion traces out our understanding of Genesis 1:26-27 for a biblical theology of the image of God. The inversion of this image leads to idolatry, conceptually speaking. The opening chapter provides a conceptual and somewhat sociological orientation to the subject. In chapter 2, Lints turns to the foundation of our creation in God’s image in Genesis 1:26-27. This additionally opens up discussion about the nature of human identity and human nature itself. In chapter 3, Lints makes note of the liturgical nature of creation and explains briefly the cosmic temple idea. This leads to a deepening of this motif in chapter 4 where Lints discusses how man was intended to image the Creator King in his cosmic temple.

Chapter 5 presents a turning point for here Lints notes the post fall origins of idolatry. Special attention is paid to the golden calf incident, as well as the prophetic foundation laid in Deuteronomy for invectives against idolatrous practices. In chapter 6, Lints moves to the New Testament, specifically Romans 1, 1 Corinthian 10, Acts 7 and 17, and Colossians 1. From here, chapter 7 turns an interesting analysis of the masters of suspicion (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche) and their “religious” critique of religion (Feuerbach makes an appearance as well). Here the focus is on idolatry as the key issue driving some of the critics of religion. That is to say, not necessarily their idolatry, but their recognition of idolatries that have found a home in religious practices. There is a sense in which their criticisms are valid, but their target is not Christianity in its truest, intended form. The final chapter brings the insights into the present cultural situation and draws some interesting applications.

On the whole, there is much of interest in Lints’ work. Perhaps the best criticism is that it doesn’t seem quite at home in this series. Given the nature of the series, one would expect more extended exegetical analysis than is offered. It is however still offering a biblical theology of the image of God and its inversion by tracing the story from Genesis 1 into the New Testament and noting the developments along the way. On the other hand, this volume is bit more philosophical (not a bad thing) than others and perhaps reflects that it is written by a theologian with philosophical and anthropological interests rather than lexical or exegetical ones (though obviously these are not mutually exclusive interests).

Depending on what you think a book in this series should do, you might find this a welcome change of pace, or a frustrating read. It didn’t stick that well with me as I read it, and that may be more due to how I was reading it than a defect in the volume itself. As I went back through to prepare this review, I found myself wanting to go back and give it a closer read for whatever that is worth. Will I actually do that? Probably not until I need to for some research project, but that tempers my opening comments a bit. If nothing else, this book clocks in under 200 pages and if you are at all interested in understanding the image of God in theological and philosophical context, you’ll probably want to at least check this out.


Richard Lints, Identity and Idolatry: The Image of God and Its Inversion (NSBT)Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, August 2015. 192  pp. Paperback, $22.00.

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Thanks to IVP Academic for the review copy!

Nate

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I'm an avid reader, musician, and high school Bible teacher living in central Florida. I have many paperback books and our house smells of rich glade air freshners. If you want to know more, then let's connect!

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