#ETS2015 Books of Note: Pastoral Reading

While I might not be at ETS this year, if you are, I thought I’d share some books you should check out. Obviously, even if you’re not at ETS, you can still check these out. You’ll just miss out on whatever deals publishers are offering at their booths. And you’ll miss out on meeting people and all that jazz, but you knew that. ETS may be an academic conference, but the participants generally are committed followers of Christ. As such, you’d want to check out these three books, even if they aren’t technically featured titles at a conference like ETS.

9780525955146

Last week, Tim Keller’s latest book The Songs of Jesus: A Year of Daily Devotions in The Psalms showed up in the mail. In some ways, it is like a sequel to Prayer, since Keller highlighted the importance of praying the Psalms in that book (see my review). This devotional basically models that approach.

The basic structure of the book is a breakdown of the entire Psalter. January 1st starts with Psalm. December 31st ends with Psalm 150. Obviously for that to work out, you don’t read an entire Psalm each day. Instead, it ends up being around 5-7 verses (give or take) per day with a short commentary and then a prayer. It’s one page per day and this is one of Keller’s small books, if you know what I mean.

There is a brief introduction (4 pgs) that helps orient us to the importance of the Psalms, and inadvertently mixes up David and Gordon Wenham (the latter of whom wrote an excellent study of the Psalms). As far as a plan for getting through the book, Keller says,

We structured this daily devotional so it can be used in three different ways. The simplest way is to read the psalm and the meditation slowly, and then use the prayer to begin praying the psalm yourself…

The second way to use the devotional is to take the time to lookup the additional scriptural references that are embedded in the meditation and sometimes in the prayer…

The third way to use the devotional is to get a blank journal to use along with it. Read the psalm portion twice slowly. Then as three questions and write out your answers:

  • Adore – What did you learn about God for which you could praise or thank him?
  • Admit – What did you learn about yourself for which you could repent?
  • Aspire – What did you learn about life that you could aspire to, ask for, and act on?

Once you have answered these three questions, you have your own meditation on the psalm.

This meditation becomes the basis for your prayer and Keller says “this will take you into the deep level of wisdom and insight the psalms can provide.” I think I’d like to start this latter path at the beginning of the year and I bet you’d benefit from doing the same.

9781848716308

Thanks to Banner of Truth, I was able to get a copy of Mark Jones’ Knowing Christ. In some sense, it is kind of sequel to J. I. Packer’s Knowing God. From what I understand, Jones sent Packer a manuscript for one of his infamous blurbs. Instead, Packer decided to write a foreword and send that back. While Packer blurbs a plethora of books, I doubt there are many that he spontaneously decides to write a forward to.

As for the book itself, the tone is meditative and devotional, yet it is still theologically rich. The chapters are on the shorter side and are supplemented by a study guide in the back with 2-5 questions per chapter. That would make this an ideal book club choice, or better yet, a book to take your discipleship group through. It is a concise Christology that is accessible to the average reader. In terms of theological depth and devotional richness, I’m not sure there is a better option as an introduction to think deeply about the person and work of Christ. There are certainly some classics that cover the same ground, but Jones’ here is fairly comprehensive in his subjects. Other authors might go deeper into certain aspects, but this book covers all the necessary basic ground.

Given the Christmas season coming quickly upon us, this is a book you might want to set aside time to read through during Advent season. Given that there are 27 chapters, you could start the weekend after Thanksgiving and read right up until Christmas. I’ve already given it a general read-thru, but I’m thinking about already giving it a more focused re-read as we move toward Christmas.

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Lastly, thanks to Crossway, I was able to read Paul Tripp’s latest, Awe: Why It Matters For Everything We Think, Say, & Do. Like many if not all books Tripp writes, he notes early (second sentence of the book) that he is primarily writing for himself. He is biblical and conversational in explaining why and how we have an “awe” problem and what we can do about it. Notes to other sources are minimal as Tripp is able to draw on a depth of pastoral insights that come from his own ministry as well as personal struggles.

In the opening chapter, Tripp makes several key points about awe which more or less shape the expositional that follows. They are (17-21):

  • Awe is everyone’s lifelong pursuit
  • God created an awesome world
  • God created you with an awe capacity
  • Where you look for awe will shape the direction of your life
  • Awe stimulates the greatest joys and deepest sorrows in us all
  • Misplaced awe keeps us perennially dissatisfied
  • Every created awe is meant to point you to the creator
  • Awesome stuff never satisfies

In the remaining chapters, Tripp explains how this leads to a war for our awe (chapter 2), and also shows how these ideas apply to church, parenting, work, and ministry (chapters 11-13, and 3). He also shows how it underlies materialism (chapter 8) as well as how most conflicts are awe conflicts. I found this book to helpful, and probably worthy of further thought and digestion. In some ways, it is a very basic idea that might not require reading the entire book to grasp. On the other hand, if you have an awe problem, you might want Tripp’s writing to help awaken you from aweless slumber.

Author: Nate

I'm an avid reader, musician, and high school Bible teacher living in central Florida. I have many paperback books and our house smells of rich glade air freshners. If you want to know more, then let's connect!

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