Genesis

This series was born out of my studies in an Ancient Near East Literature doctoral seminar. It connected with some topics from my studies over the previous summer in Hebrew III and I also just have an on going fascination with the early chapters of Genesis. Most of what I am unpacking regarding Genesis comes from a couple of John Walton books (which you can find on theĀ recommended reading page). I am also making use of a commentary on Genesis 1-4 by C. John Collins. I originally intended to make it through chapter 4, but stalled out in chapter 2. If you think I ought to pick it back up, let me know!

Anyway, here are the links:

12 responses to Genesis

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  1. Thoughts on Genesis | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  2. Genesis: Backgrounds (A) | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  3. Genesis 1: Introduction | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  4. Genesis 1: Structure | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  5. Genesis 1: Days 1-3 | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  6. Genesis 2: Introduction | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  7. Genesis 1: Days 4-6 | Marturo - January 30, 2012

    […] [This post is part of theĀ GenesisĀ series] […]

  8. Expository Blogging: Exodus 2:1-10 | Nate Claiborne | Constant streams... - February 10, 2014

    […] If you’ve been following my blog for awhile, you’ll know that I enjoy reading Nate Claiborne’sĀ blog. He not only reviews at length a lot of books that I would find interesting, but he’s one of a few people I’ve been reading lately who attempt to work through scripture through the lens of how the original readers would have understood it. If you want to read about a view of Genesis that completely undercuts the creation vs evolution debate (because when did ancient writers ever write scientific or historical documents following modern conventions for those genres?) you can find Claiborne’s discussion of Genesis here. […]

  9. Plenty of reading! :D Now for a plan. | Constant streams... - February 19, 2014

    […] accuracy as we would understand it). Should be interesting, from what I’ve read so far in Nate Claiborne’s exploration of the subject, this method seems much more logical and consistent, without requiring or excluding the conclusions […]

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